Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC)

Community College of Allegheny County

College Council Meeting Minutes April 28, 2011

COLLEGE COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES
APRIL 28, 2011
OFFICE OF COLLEGE SERVICES BOARD ROOM   

ATTENDANCE

  
PRESENTABSENT  GUESTS
Richard Allison
Maryann Anderson
Mary Frances Archey
John Dziak
Carl Francolino
Rita Gallegos
Jane Greenwood
Shirley Harr
Donna Imhoff
Nancy Jenkins
Evelyn Kitchens-Stephens  
Rachel Matheis 
Bonnie Ordonez
Maura Stevenson
Barbara Thompson
Marianne Trale
Stephen Wells
 Lucille Adkins
Don Breibarth
Susan Brown
Jacki Connolly
Brian Jump
Robert Kmetz
Sue McCleary
Pamela Nichols
Mary Kate Quinlan
Brad Sandrock
Joanne Smutko
Brenda Trettel
Elizabeth Vargo
Jim Robertson
Allysen Todd
Gretchen Mullin-Sawicki

Maryann Anderson, College Council Chair, called the meeting to order at 2:00 PM. 

AGENDA ITEM I: APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE
APRIL 14, 2011 MEETING OF COLLEGE COUNCIL
 

Rita Gallegos moved to approve the minutes of the April 14, 2011 meeting of College Council. Donna Imhoff seconded the motion and the minutes were approved as amended. 

AGENDA ITEM II: SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS

A.  ASSESSMENT AND RESEARCH    

Carl Francolino reported that the work of Assessment and Research will continue this summer. He will be building the Blackboard site, and other members will be looking at site and linking resources. 

B.  ACADEMIC PLANNING

Steve Wells introduced the 2 program reviews.

Program/Discipline Review:  Five Year Program Review for Engineering Transfer Programs:  Engineering Science (093), Engineering Technology (094), Manufacturing Engineering (707)
Gretchen Mullin-Sawicki and Brad Sandrock presented the program review for the Engineering Transfer Program. Mr. Sandrock reported that the labs in the department are very small and contain a lot of equipment that is difficult to keep up to date. 

The review of course syllabi showed that several courses need to be updated and course objectives aligned with Bloom’s Taxonomy. These courses will be presented to College Council to be deleted or updated in the future. 

The strength of the Manufacturing Engineering program is that it is an industry standard program which is transferrable to Robert Morris University. It is also a high tech program into which many certificate graduates can transfer. 

The strength of the Engineering Science Program is that it offers students the ability to attend college for a low cost, and then transfer as juniors into the Engineering program at many universities.

The strength of the Engineering Technology Program is that there are many articulation agreements with this program giving students many options.

Weaknesses include that few of the students who complete the programs actually take the time to graduate. There is also confusion between the 2 Engineering programs. In the Engineering Technology program, the three options for students, Mechanical, Civil and Electrical are not clearly defined. This is being addressed.

Bonnie Ordonez moved to accept the program review. Jane Greenwood seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Program/Discipline Review:  Massage Therapy Degree Program (#443.1) and Massage Therapist Certificate Program (#695.1)
Joanne Smutko presented the program review. Mrs. Smutko pointed out that CCAC students sitting for the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage Examination have a 100% pass rate.  Enrollment is down 8%; however, enrollment is down 11% nationally. Mrs. Smutko commented that the program is hard to maintain with just her. An adjunct and perhaps a student who has not been licensed yet would be a help.

Students in the program do community work, donating their massage services at hospitals, senior centers and residences and for associations. Students also give free massages on Tuesdays and Wednesdays during January thru April for the community.

Donna Imhoff moved to accept the program review. Marianne Trale seconded the motion and the motion to accept passed unanimously. 

C.  ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Evelyn Kitchens Stephens reported that a special meeting of the Subcommittee was held on April 20 with a quorum present. The Subcommittee revisited the F/N Grade Proposal and rejected it. There is another device that Fran Dice can use to gather the data that she needs. Mrs. Dice will return in the Fall with a revised proposal.

Program Review:  Job Placement & Career Services Comprehensive Student Development Services Assessment
Bob Kmetz, the Director of Job Placement and Career Services at Allegheny Campus presented the program review. There was extensive input from staff and Advisory Board members in the writing of this program review. Mary Kate Quinlan facilitated the process. The program review included seven elements which are 1) Overview, 2) Objectives, 3) Diversity, 4) Collaboration, 5) General Education Goals of the College, 6) Department Policies and Procedures, and 7) Resources.  

While staffing is consistent across campuses, it does not reflect FTEs. Support is provided to all the Centers; however, West Hills is especially challenging to the North campus staff because of its growth and emphasis on technical and trade programs. Specifically trained staff is needed to address the unique situation of the growing population of veterans, individuals with disabilities, those in non-traditional occupations, the long-term under or unemployed, and ex-offenders seeking re-entry into the workforce.

Maura Stevenson moved to accept the program review. Bonnie Ordonez seconded the motion and the program review was accepted with 12 votes in favor and 2 abstentions.

Program Review:  Registration and Advisement Comprehensive Student Development Services Assessment
Sue McCleary, Director of Registration and Advisement presented the program review.  

The program review included seven elements which are 1) Assessment Elements, 2) Objectives/Assessment, 3) Diversity, 4) Collaboration, 5) General Education Goals of the College, 6) Department Policies and Procedures Manual, and 7) Identify the Resources Needed as Supported by the Assessment Results. There was extensive input from staff and external evaluators in the writing of this program review. 

The assessment results indicated the need for additional staff including an Assistant Director of Registration and Advisement at each of the campuses, as well as additional SEIU staff at some campuses. The program review indicated that having full-time professional academic advisors would improve the consistency and delivery of services to students.

A correction on Page 7 of the program review under “Weaknesses,” the fifth bullet should be changed to “Inability to assess qualifications of advisors.”

Carl Francolino moved to accept the program review.  Steve Wells seconded the motion and the motion passed 13 votes in favor and 1 abstention.

Proposal:  Requiring Reading in the First Semester
Mary Kate Quinlan presented the proposal which would require first time, degree-seeking students who score into the lowest level of Developmental Reading to take their first reading course in their first semester. The proposal was based on data from Fall 2004 to Fall 2009, analyzed by Institutional Research. The GPA for at-risk students who take reading in their first semester is 1.69, in the second semester is 1.7. Of those who do not take reading in their first year, the average GPA is 1.47.

The following policy language was recommended:
“First time, degree-seeking students who score into the lowest level of Developmental Reading are required to take DVS 060 and DVS 070 in their first semester.”

There was some concern expressed that there might not be enough sections or space to accommodate this policy change.  Ms. Quinlan said that the College is aware of this.

Although this would be implemented in the Fall semester, those students who have already registered who fit in the at-risk category would not be required to follow the new policy. This is relatively few students.

Bonnie Ordonez moved to accept the proposal. Barbara Thompson seconded the motion and the motion passed 13 votes is favor and one abstention. 

Request for a Temporary change to the Nursing Admissions Process
Sharon Brown presented the request which would delete the following requirement from the current admissions criteria: “If Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BIO 161) or Microbiology (BIO 175) were completed prior to admission to the Nursing program, students must have completed them with a “C” grade or better within the last ten years.”

The Nursing program normally has twice the applicants as they do currently. This was a temporary compromise that the Nursing faculty were willing to make in the admissions criteria in order to build enrollment. The implementation of this temporary change is for the Fall 2011 term only.

Rita Gallegos moved to accept the request. Maura Stevenson seconded the motion and the motion passed with 12 in favor, one opposed, and one abstention.

D.   CURRICULUM

Before the Curriculum report, Council honored Maura Stevenson who will be moving to Connecticut this summer. Maura has served on Council for many years and will be greatly missed.

Proposal: Revision of Certificate Dietary Manager Program Description (#591.1) to Include Program Objectives and Accreditation Information
Liz Vargo, Program Coordinator of the Dietetic Technician Program presented the proposal which revises the program description to include program objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy, and includes the accreditation contact information for the Dietary Managers Association.

Evelyn Kitchen-Stephens moved to accept the proposal. Carl Francolino seconded the motion, and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Revision of Degree Dietetic Technician Program (590.1) Description to Include Program Objectives
Liz Vargo, Program Coordinator of the Dietetic Technician Program presented the proposal which revises the program description to include program objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy, and includes the accreditation contact information for the American Dietetic Association.

Steve Wells moved to accept the proposal. Rita Gallegos seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Revisions of the Phlebotomist Program (#513)
Bonnie Gregg, the initiator of the proposal was unable to attend College Council, so the proposal was presented by Rick Allison.

The proposal includes adding program learning objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. Content was increased in two courses which added credits to the program. The credits for PHB 101, Clinical Phlebotomy were increased from 3 to 4 credits, and the credits for PHB 211 Clinical Phlebotomy Seminar were increased from 2 to 3 credits. Also ALH 106, Basic Life Support, was added to the program. The program credits now total 12, which makes it a full-time program that qualifies for financial aid. This was one of the few remaining diploma programs and is now a certificate program.

A correction was made to page 6, paragraph 4 of the proposal, correcting the spelling of “Basic.”

Rachel Matheis moved to accept the proposal with corrections. Rita Gallegos seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Revision of MUS common course syllabi (13)
Allysen Todd presented the proposal stating that Music courses have not been revised in many years. The proposal rewords catalog course descriptions and learning outcomes, and reorganizes topics for MUS 101, 103, 104, 115, 116, 119, 121, 122, 203, 204, 215, 216, and 253.

The following corrections were made to the proposal:
Page 5, the Prerequisite is MUS 101 rather than none

Page 7, and 8, Catalog Course Description, “Jazz” should be capitalized, and the “:” removed after “Some of the styles covered are.”

Page 12, Catalog Course Description, the last line, “This class is open to non-majors with an adequate musical background” will be removed.
Learning Outcomes # 3, “principles” is misspelled.
Learning Outcome # 5, “part writing” is not hyphenated.

Page 13, Learning Outcomes # 3, “principles” is misspelled

Page 14 and 15, Catalog Course Description, “Jazz” should be capitalized, and the “:” removed after “Some of the styles covered are.”

Page 16, Catalog Course Description, “Jazz” should be capitalized
Listed Topics # 1,4 “Jazz” should be capitalized
Listed Topic # 3, “Swing Era” should be capitalized

Rachel Matheis moved to accept the proposal with corrections. Rita Gallegos seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Add FCL 125, Introduction to Arabic and FCL 135, Arabic II as language courses
George Jaber and Brenda Trettel presented the proposal which adds two Arabic language courses, FCL 125, Introduction to Arabic and FCL 135, Arabic 2 which can be used as electives. This will expand students’ options when they need an elective. The addition of these two courses is very timely in today’s world.

The following correction will be made:

Page 4, Catalog Course Description, the second sentence will be revised to start, “Students will study Arab cultures…”
Learning Outcome # 2, remove the word “Arab” before the word “world.”
Listed Topic # 1 and 3, change “Arab” to “Arabic.”
Listed Topic # 5, change “culture” to “cultures.”

Page 7, Learning Outcomes # 3, should begin, “Describe Arab cultures…”
Learning Outcomes # 6, delete the word “Arab” before the word “world.”
Learning Outcomes # 10, Delete the entire outcome.

Donna Imhoff moved to accept the proposal as amended.  Jane Greenwood seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Course revisions to ANT 117, GEO 101, HIS 229, POL110
Brenda Trettel presented the proposal which revises ANT 117, GEO 101 and HIS 229 and aligns the objectives with Bloom’s Taxonomy. POL 110 did not have a syllabus on record, therefore the proposal establishes one.

The following correction were made:
Page 13, Catalog Course Description, in the first sentence, remove the “.” after “America.”
Learning Outcomes # 7 should end with a period after “World War II.”
Establish Learning Outcomes # 8, to read, “Provide details about American foreign policy since 1945.”
Listed Topic # 3, after “World War,” “1” should be changed to “I.”

Marianne Trale moved to accept the proposal as amended. Barbara Thompson seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Film Worker Certificate
George Jaber presented the proposal which would establish a new certificate program, Film Worker, which uses existing courses. With so many films being made in Pittsburgh, there is a need for fast track training that this certificate would provide. Students can take nine months of training and enter the workforce. The movie Batman will be shot here in May, and there are 6 other potential films this summer. Mr. Jaber stated that in the College’s Master Plan, South Campus will be a Technical Theatre Center.

Steve Wells moved to accept the proposal. Rita Gallegos seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

Proposal: Course revisions to THE 101, THE 108, THE 109, THE 119, THE 154 and THE 155 and delete THE 217 and THE 218
George Jaber presented this proposal which revises and aligns objectives according to Bloom’s Taxonomy to the following courses: THE 101, Introduction to Theatre; THE 108, Acting 1; THE 109, Acting 2; THE 119, Introduction to Stage Direction; THE 154, Introduction to Cinema; and THE 155, Improvisation. THE 217, Theatre Production 3 and THE 218, Theatre Production 4 will be eliminated.   They have not been offered in years.

The following corrections will be made:
Page 9, Course Title should be “Acting 1” rather than “ACTING 1”
Learning Outcomes # 4, should read, “Use performance techniques, alone and with others, in various types of acting exercises.”

Page 24, Course Title should be “Acting 2” rather than “ACTING 2”
Learning Outcomes # 3, should read, “Utilize vocal production skills in performances.”
Learning Outcomes # 5, should read in part, “Prepare and perform…”

Page 15, Learning Outcomes # 5, “Evaluate” is misspelled.

Page 21, Learning Outcomes # 2, should read in part, “Use improvisational techniques as they relate…”

Marianne Trale moved to accept the proposal as amended. Carl Francolino seconded the motion and the motion passed unanimously.

AGENDA ITEM III: UNFINISHED BUSINESS

Barbara Thompson noted that the instructions for the waiver exam for BIO 161 and BIO 175 have not been sent to the campus testing centers. Brenda Trettel said that she will insure that the instructions are sent.  

Donna Imhoff added a clarification for the Student Handbook that we must add the names, addresses, and telephone numbers, for the Deans of Students because they are the coordinators for Title IX and VI for each campus of their respective centers.  This is for information purposes to Council so that everyone is informed of this minor addition that is necessary for the College to be compliant with the laws and with the Office of Civil Rights within the new changes to the handbook.

AGENDA ITEM IV: NEW BUSINESS

Dr. Johnson’s response to the Recommendations of the Faculty Hiring Work Group
Steve Wells distributed a report produced by the Hiring Process Working Group, a group of faculty and administrators who were charged by Dr. Johnson to look at hiring practices especially as they relate to retiring faculty. The number of full-time faculty has decreased by 100 over the last 10 years. The College has as a goal to work toward 60% of courses being taught by full-time faculty and 40% being taught by adjuncts. The report, with Dr. Johnson’s responses which appear in bold, is attached to these minutes.

President’s Council, Achieving the Dream Coach’s Letter
President’s Council met April 25 and learned that it is being strongly recommended that CCAC be granted Leader College Status for the Achieving the Dream work that has been accomplished. There are only 30 such colleges nationally.

Definition of Full-Time students in the summer
Mary Frances Archey provided the following document which defines full-time summer students, that was presented to President’s Cabinet. 

DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME STATUS IN THE SUMMER
FOR CABINET - April 19, 2011

Over the past few weeks there have been discussions at CCAC about the definition of full-time status during the summer as a result of the College needing to define this for the CareerLink Offices and our discovering that different offices were advancing different definitions.  As a result, research was conducted of how the College reports enrollments to the State, how the other PA community colleges defined full-time status in the summer, the VA definition, how full-time status is defined for financial aid purposes and how the academic deans at CCAC define this status.  As a result of this research, the following clarification on the definition of full-time status in the summer is being advanced for CCAC:

Due to CCAC’s scheduling pattern for the summer with the first summer term being in one fiscal year and the second summer term being in a separate fiscal year, any students who enroll for a total of 12 credits during the first summer term, regardless of how they register, i.e., for 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks, 10 weeks or any combination of these sessions they will be defined as full-time.  Students registering for 12 credits for the second summer term will also be defined as full-time for that term.

Enrolling students who are below the junior year in high school
Mary Frances Archey distributed the following statement which applies to students who want to enroll at CCAC and are below their junior year in high school:

Students who have not completed the sophomore year of high school
The Community College of Allegheny County is committed to ensuring the integrity and content of credit and non credit coursework.  The non-credit instructional area offers coursework that is content and age appropriate for adolescents.

High school juniors and seniors are welcome to take credit classes with the approval of their parents and their school district through the dual or concurrent enrollment programs.  Those students must take placement testing and/or meet the pre-requisites of their selected coursework (as do matriculated students).  Students who have not yet completed the sophomore year of high school but who wish to take credit coursework (and adult continuing education coursework) must seek CCAC approval and present supporting documentation from their school district.

Credit classes:
Student must request approval to register from the campus associate academic dean who, with the instructor, will decide if the course content and conditions are appropriate for the student (who must also meet all academic requirements).

Non-credit:
Student must request approval to register from the continuing education director who will, with the instructor, decide if the course content and conditions are appropriate for the student.

New College Council Members for 2011-2013
Maryann Anderson reported that there are positions open at Allegheny and North Campuses that will be settled over the summer. Mrs. Anderson added her sincere thanks and appreciation to the outgoing members of College Council for their service.

There being no further business, the meeting ended at 6:00 PM.

Respectfully submitted,
Barbara Thompson
College Council Secretary 

 

 

 

Response to the Recommendations of the Hiring Process Working Group
Please accept my sincere appreciation for serving on the Hiring Process Working Group.  Its charge was to investigate and make recommendations on how to address a possible deluge of retirements, leading to a lack of experienced faculty, particularly in the critical areas of English, mathematics, and science.   A further assignment was to recommend how these faculty might continue to provide service after retirement. 

Role of the Group
Although, the working group discussed a myriad of issues related to hiring at the college, its primary responsibilities could be summarized as follows:

  1. Determine a system for replacing faculty who are retiring.
  2. Confirm that the Academic Planning Sub-Committee and College Council retain their role in the hiring process, as noted in the AFT Contract.
  3. Identify the core disciplines in which faculty should be replaced without justification based on the number of Student Credit Hours taught, i.e. over 30,000 as documented by the Institutional Research Report showing Student Credit Hours taught.
  4. Determine a system to reach/maintain the 60/40 ratio of full-time to part-time faculty teaching classes in the core disciplines while noting that approximately 10 years ago the AFT had between 440 and 450 members and now there is between 330 and 340 members.

To address the aims of the project, a number of reports were reviewed including:

  • Report of faculty by Campus, title, and age
  • List of CCAC Hires since July, 2010
  • Summary report of AFT members by decade
  • Reports of staff lists since 2006, new hires, terminations, new positions
  • Summary report of the number and average age of individuals leaving CCAC
  • Student Credit Hours taught by discipline and campus
  • Summary of CCAC employees by employment status for the last five years
  • Summary of new hires by category of employment for the last five years
  • Number of over-all employees as calculated for the Employee Comprehensive Campaign

Based upon the review of this data, the working group, within the context of the Academic Planning Committee and College Council in the recommending of AFT positions, advanced a set of recommendations.  These recommendations are underlined and my response follows each one in bold.

Response to the Recommendations

Provide retired faculty compensation for teaching on an adjunct basis, as currently provided in the listing of staffing priorities in the AFT Contract, at the full-time overage rate rather than the rate paid adjunct faculty. 

Faculty members who have served the institution faithfully for most of their professional careers should be acknowledged for their long term commitment.  It is my hope, then, that we can discuss in the near future what constitutes this recognition for retirees from the professoriate, including their continued association with the college on a voluntary or paid basis.  At that time I would like to revisit the recommendation to pay faculty retirees at the full-time overage rate rather than the rate paid adjunct faculty. 

In the core disciplines of biology, English and math, i.e., the disciplines with 30,000+ Student Credit Hours being taught, positions created by retirements should be replaced without the need for justification through the Academic Planning Committee/College Council’s hiring processes.  This practice should continue until the Campus ratio reaches 60/40.  The process for hiring in the core disciplines should be reinstated if the ratio on a Campus again drops below the 60/40 level.

I agree with this recommendation.  However, I would suggest that this proposal be presented to the Academic Planning Committee of the College Council to ensure that this group has full understanding of the impact on the hiring process.

If a retirement occurs in biology, English or math outside of the normal time-frame for hiring, the positions would be filled with adjuncts until the next regular hiring cycle begins.

This system is currently in place and will remain so. 

Additional faculty for the core disciplines desired by a Department/Campus should be requested through the established hiring process, i.e., advancing the request with justifications through the Academic Planning Committee’s processes.

I agree with this recommendation.

Until the institution reaches the 60/40 ratio, for every two faculty members retiring, the College should hire three faculty members; the calculation should be rounded up if there are an odd number of retirements.  The first of these positions would go to replace any retiring faculty in Biology, English and Math, without the Department/Campus needing to provide justification for the replacements to the Academic Planning Committee/College Council.  The remaining positions would be justified through the Academic Planning Committee’s process.

I agree with this recommendation, up to 10 retirements in a given year or as resources allow. 

This proposal means that only retirements in English, mathematics, and science would be replaced one-for-one without placement in the hiring pool.  So, for example, if two faculty members in English retire, three positions are authorized.  They are replaced automatically and the third position, the "bonus" position, is placed in the hiring pool.

However, if the 2 retirements are in any other discipline, the two replacements and the bonus position go into the hiring pool.

Please be reminded that when funds made available through retirements are insufficient for creating the bonus positions, it may be necessary for the college to draw monies  from its limited general fund.  This action might limit the establishment of new faculty positions. 

Further, your proposal to “round up” if there is an odd number of retirements could possibly lead once again to the diminution of any new faculty positions that the college might want to entertain.  Therefore, I offer for your consideration an approach that is presented in the following chart:

Retirements

Bonus

Positions

Replacements

1

0

1

2

1

3

3

1

4

4

2

6

5

2

7

6

3

9

7

3

10

8

4

12

9

4

13

10

5

15

The calculation of AFT positions due to retirements for any year should be based on the actual number of retirements during the year prior to the one when the request for positions would be advanced.  For the 2012-2013 year, the number of faculty to be hired due to retirements should be based on the number of retirements between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. 

I agree with this recommendation.

The College should allocate twelve new positions each year to the AFT, which is the average number of positions authorized by the College for AFT positions during the last three years.   These positions can be allocated through the existing governance process to replace retiring faculty in disciplines other than biology, English and math; expanding the faculty in any disciplines; and hiring counselors, librarians, educational technicians, and system-wide positions.

At this time it is not possible for the college to commit to a specific number of additional positions above the ones generated by the current proposal as it relates to the replacement of retirees.  However, whenever possible, the college will continue to add new faculty positions to the base.   Our actions over the last three years should provide some comfort in this regard.

This process advanced for replacing retiring faculty should be reviewed every 5 years.

I would like to propose that the recommended actions be reviewed every 3 years.

Once, again, thank you for your hard work and I look forward to receiving any feedback you feel comfortable providing.  Also, I would like to reconvene the working group periodically to assist with determining the effectiveness of these recommendations.